resolutions
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It's so tough to get ahead while you owe other people money. Here's how you fix it.
5 Money Resolutions You Can Make Year-Round
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Resolutions aren't just for January — especially when it comes to your money. Here are seven financial goals you can (and should) tackle year-round.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

13 Budget-Friendly Heart Healthy Foods and Activities
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13 Budget-Friendly Heart Healthy Foods and Activities is a post originally published on: Everything Finance - Everything Finance - Its all about Money!

With the New Year comes New Years resolutions for a lot of us. And with everything that has been going on the past year with the pandemic, health is high up on the list of things to change. While COVID has been a real threat recently, heart health is still a top killer here in the U.S. So, this is a great area to focus on when it comes to overall health. Focusing on your heart health doesn’t have to cost you a ton of money and can actually save you money in overall health care costs down the line.

13 Budget-Friendly Heart Healthy Foods and Activities is a post originally published on: Everything Finance - Everything Finance - Its all about Money!

Get Your Bank Accounts in Order With These 2021 Resolutions
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Though the year is well underway, it’s never too late to set new goals, whether you want to do 100 push-ups a day or try meatless Mondays. If you want…
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As a new year dawns, deals abound for some types of products. In other cases, it pays to wait.
Here are the offers on Marriott cards right now – The Points Guy
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Editor’s note: This is a recurring post, regularly updated with the most current offers.  While you may not be traveling right now, that doesn’t mean you can’t use this time to rack up points and miles for when you book your next getaway. And for a limited time through Jan. 13, 2021, you could also …
Declined By TeleCheck? Reasons Why + Phone Numbers
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If you have trouble getting your checks accepted at the store, learn more about Telecheck and how it can affect your daily errands.
How to Make Professional Resolutions for 2021 that You'll Actually Keep
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New Year's resolutions. According to Inc. Magazine, 60% of us make them. But many of us know that when it comes to actually keeping New Year's resolutions, the odds aren't exactly in our favor. Research shows that, despite our best intentions, only 8% of us accomplish those annual goals we set for ourselves.

If you're anything like me, 2020 has left you hungrier than ever for fresh starts and clean slates.

What keeps us coming back every year? Well, as PsychCentral tells us, it’s partly tradition (we are creatures of habit!) and partly the allure of a fresh start, a clean slate. And let’s be honest, if you're anything like me, 2020 has left you hungrier than ever for fresh starts and clean slates.

That fresh start can apply to your professional life just as easily as it applies to dropping a few pounds, quitting your Starbucks habit, or taking up hot yoga. So, let's talk about some strategies to help you set career resolutions and, most importantly, actually keep them.

Goals versus resolutions

Every year I hear people say “My New Year’s resolution is to lose 20 pounds.” But technically speaking, that’s not a resolution, it’s a goal. It’s an outcome that you either do or don’t achieve.

A New Year's resolution is “a promise that you make to yourself to start doing something good or stop doing something bad on the first day of the year” according to the Cambridge English Dictionary.

Two things I love most about resolutions are that I have a chance to win every day, and I have complete control over my success.

A goal might be to achieve a revenue target, land an interview with someone you admire, or strike up a coveted partnership.

A resolution defines the experience you want to have. It’s about the how not the what. When I think of resolutions, I think of habits that will bring out the best version of myself—something like a promise to plan my day the night before so I'm ready to jump in fresh first thing in the morning.

The two things I love most about resolutions are that I have a chance to win every day, and I have complete control over my success.

4 strategies to help you set (and keep!) professional resolutions

1. Reflect on what you’d like to change

Resolutions begin with an honest look at the year closing behind you. For me, 2020 has had some highs, but on balance, it wasn’t my cutest. There’s a lot I’d love to change next year. And my resolutions focus on a few key areas that live within my locus of control.

There is no shame or blame here; there is only space for reflection.

So where am I choosing to focus? For me, there are three distinct experiences I had this year that I plan not to repeat in the one upcoming.

Overwhelm. That not-so-adorable feeling that the world is sitting on my shoulders—that my clients’ success and my kids’ education and my aging parents’ welfare are all relying on me. Can’t do it again next year.

Reacting from a place of fear. Holding my breath, taking on more work than I know I should because what if the economy doesn’t bounce back? Will not repeat this one in ’21.

Loneliness. Hi, I’m Rachel, and I’m an extrovert! (Here's where all you fellow extroverts respond with, "Hi, Rachel!") If travel and face-to-face meetings won’t be an option for a beat, then I’ve got to be intentional about finding ways to bring more connection into my life.

These three experiences put a damper on my 2020. Note there is no shame or blame here; there is only space for reflection.

Be thoughtful about what aspects of the year felt heavy for you and commit to changing your experience next year.

Maybe your experience of 2020 was grounded in anxiety, or you’ve felt job-insecurity, or maybe just boredom. There are no wrong answers, so be thoughtful about what aspects of the year felt heavy for you and commit to changing your experience next year.

2. Project what "better" would look and feel like

Ask yourself: If these are the experiences I don’t want to have again, what would it feel like to be on the other side?

Here’s what I came up with.

Shedding overwhelm would mean having a clear plan of attack each day. Rather than scrambling and juggling, I’d have a set of daily priorities ensuring clients, kids, mental health, and all significant constituents have what they need from me. The most critical things get done each day, and if nothing else gets done, I’ve still won.

Not feeling reactive and fearful? That will mean a shift in mindset from “What if the market doesn’t need what I offer?” to “How am I evolving my products and solutions to meet the changing needs of the market?”

And finally (sigh ...) the loneliness. I talked about this in a quick video on my Modern Mentor page on LinkedIn. I miss the energy I take, the creativity I see triggered by moments of collaboration and brainstorming. It’s that very sense of ideas building on ideas that I want to recreate in 2021.

Now it’s your turn. What would your “better” look like in 2021?

If you’re job-insecure, maybe "better" means adding skills or certifications to your resume. If it’s anxiety you're wrestling with, maybe your “better” includes more self-care and relaxation.

The only wrong answers here are the ones that don’t resonate with you. You’re less likely to stick with a resolution that isn’t personally meaningful.

3.  Define sustainable practices that will move you there

The words “sustainable” and “practices” are key here.

“Lose 20 pounds” doesn’t qualify as a resolution because it’s an outcome you can’t fully control. What you can control are the habits designed to get you there, like eating better or exercising. And if exercising every day feels unsustainable, then shoot for twice a week to start. Make it an easy win for yourself!

I’ll take the three experiences I want to have and translate those into habits and practices I can control.

So how does this translate into the professional realm? I’ll take the three experiences I want to have and translate those into habits and practices I can control. Here’s my working list.

In 2021 I will:

Choose my One Thing

I'll begin each day by identifying the one thing I need to achieve in service of:

  • My kids (Example: Check my 6th grader’s math homework)
  • An existing client (Example: Develop slides for next week’s leadership workshop)
  • My health (Example: Yep, it's a workout!)
  • My business growth (Example: Pitch an article to a big publication)

Once I get all that done, whatever else I do that day is gravy.

Make weekly client connections

I will schedule one call per week with a past or current client for the sole purpose of listening. I won't be there to sell or help, but just to hear what’s on their minds, and what needs they've anticipated for the near future. This will allow me to be more planful and proactive in designing my offerings.

Set up virtual office hours

I will host bi-weekly office hours. I’ll share a Zoom link with a dozen of my friends and colleagues and invite people to pop in … or not. No agenda, no one in charge, just an open space for sharing ideas, challenges, and even some occasional gossip.

Pay attention to the fact that all of these resolutions are within my control. I’m not waiting for circumstances to change, and I’m not holding myself accountable to an outcome, I'm just committing to doing these things.

4. Track and celebrate

And finally, the fun part. Each resolution gets a page of its own in my Bullet Journal, which means lots of colorful checks and boxes! I keep track of how many days or weeks per month I stick with my resolutions. I set small goals for myself, and I give myself little rewards for hitting milestones. My reward might be an afternoon off, an extra hour of Netflix (do not tell the kids!), or an outdoor, socially distanced coffee with a friend. Celebration is so important. It motivates me to repeat the habit and have a better experience.

So there you have my secrets to setting and keeping my resolutions. I would be so grateful if you’d share yours with me on Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn. I’d be delighted to be your accountability buddy!

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